Former NH state senator and ’60s anti-war activist says we can take ‘reasonable anti-massacre precautions’. 2nd Amendment not in any danger

I just watched this video on my morning news and was simply dumbfounded.

Burt Cohen, a former New Hampshire state senator, and Obama supporter, told a WMUR interviewer that “we” can take “reasonable anti-massacre precautions” and that the Second Amendment is not in any danger at all.

Huh?

Never heard of Burt Cohen? Me, neither.

Cohen’s is the perfect progressive pedigree. He writes on his blog:

    A forty-plus year champion in the fight for social and economic justice, Burt Cohen’s lifelong passion for social and political issues began at an early age. Only nine years old, Cohen found himself standing on the street corner passing out fliers for John F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign – and he knew he was hooked.

    Through the turbulent landscape of the 60s and 70s, Burt Cohen turned this passion into action. No stranger to the smell of tear gas, his experiences led him to the frontlines of many social and political causes – including making his voice heard at the 1971 Mayday protests and traveling through Nicaragua working for peace and justice with Abbie Hoffman.

    However, it was Rock & Roll that ultimately changed his life. In 1980, as an intern at the nation’s biggest rock station WBCN, Cohen joined the news department and began a new chapter of his life in politics and radio.

    At WBCN, Cohen was able to interview and explore the ideas of intellectuals such as Gore Vidal and Tom Hayden. When Burt left WBCN to continue his radio career at WBBX, he then had the opportunity to interview Senator George McGovern. Inspired by McGovern’s message of equality and peace, Cohen left WBBX to work on McGovern’s presidential campaign.

    From this moment onward, it was only a matter of time before Burt would himself seek to enact change through political office. In 1990, Burt won election to New Hampshire’s State Senate where he was elected to seven terms including time as Senate Majority Leader. There he was able to tackle tough issues as diverse as the safe storage of firearms, marriage equality, the Clean Power Act, and fairer taxes for working men and women.

Well, ain’t that just special. Now we know why only Burt Cohen and Arlo Guthrie seem to have come up with the idea of an “anti-massacre”.

You have to read Guthrie’s 1966 over-the-top tale about his antics with the draft and the backstory explaining the lyrics in his classic song, Alice’s Restaurant, to understand the context for the phrase “anti-massacre movement”.

Apparently, nobody else, including all the chuckleheads in the gun control movement, has come up with such a bizarre concept as “anti-massacre precautions”. Nobody.

And just what would those “anti-massacre precautions” be, anyhow? Got me. I have no idea.

Should you think Cohen has hung up his ’60s era activism, rest assured he’s still at it:

    Over the years, Burt has also found time to contribute to The Nation magazine, writes a regular column for The New Hampshire Business Review, as well as serve on the faculty of Southern NH University and the College of Lifelong Learning, teaching a new generation to keep their minds open, to listen with their conscience, and take action when necessary.

#youvebeenwarned

One comment on “Former NH state senator and ’60s anti-war activist says we can take ‘reasonable anti-massacre precautions’. 2nd Amendment not in any danger

  1. working for peace and justice with Abbie Hoffman…no need to read any further. these people are communist radicals…we need to start taking them down or we’re all finished.

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